[ HISTORY ] [ 4. PROGRESS ] [ C. CONSOLIDATION ]
 


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Apart from the 21-day strike of 1920 caused by the conflicting interests of two unions, industrial relations in Lever Brothers' after the war were relatively harmonious. Indeed the General Strike of 1926 largely passed the village by; life in the 1920's and 1930's was a time of consolidation. Workers knew they were better off than most in those years escaping the vagaries of unemployment suffered elsewhere. They continued to enjoy the free holiday camps at Thurstaston and Rivington Pike, Bolton, the lavish outings (pictured, the British Empire Exhibition of 1924) and general festivities on such days as Founders' Day (an annual event after Lever's death).The outbreak of the Second World War ushered in a new era when the cohesion of the community would be tested to its limits. Port Sunlight was a target because glycerine, a soap ingredient was also integral in the manufacture of bombs. Also, drifting bombs targetted on Liverpool would frequently hit the village with a particular ferocity in 1941 when an entire family were killed and five houses were destroyed.By the end of war, housing damage was extensive, the Collegium was destroyed (never rebuilt) with repairs and restoration going on until 1951. Another period of consolidation was under way.


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