[ HISTORY ] [ 2. ETHOS ] [ B. CONDITION OF ENGLAND ]
 


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In England 1801, seven out of ten people lived in the country. By 1910, this had decreased to two out of every ten. On the accession of Queen Victoria there were only 5 cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants; by 1891 there were 23. The Industrial Revolution turned the average Englishman from a countryman into an urban industrial worker. The ruling spirit of free enterprise made it possible for industrialists to make a fortune but it caused conditions of social distress, squalor and misery for many. This conflict of interests came to be called "the condition of England question." According to D.Thompson, the historian, " sweated labour and slum dwellings were not invented by the men who made the Industrial Revolution, they were discovered by them, discussed by them and in the end partially remedied by them." (note 3)


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